Southern Style Bourbon Pecan Pie with Biscoff Crust

This Thanksgiving I figured I’d have a go at one of my brother’s favorites, pecan pie. After our Ireland trip we definitely ascribe to the “everything tastes better with a little whiskey” school of baked goods, so I opted for a bit of bourbon to go with the southern style of the pie. Bourbon tends to add a nice rich depth to the flavor of anything with brown sugar. Adding the bourbon is optional; when done properly you shouldn’t really taste it, just a fuller silkier overall flavor. I also have a slight addiction to Biscoff/Speculoos cookies so I wanted to try that as a crust, hoping it didn’t overpower the pie and it complimented it perfectly. And my brother, the pecan pie snob, said it was the best he’s ever had.

  • 1 package Biscoff Cookies
  • Half stick of butter (softened)
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 cup dark corn syrup
  • 3 Eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 1/2 cup pecan halves
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon Bourbon(and then help  yourself to a nice two finger pour like a good southern girl)

Makes a 9 inch deep dish pie

Grease the pan with just a little bit of the butter. Crush the cookies in the food processor, adding in softened butter a spoonful at a time. When thoroughly blended, press into the pie dish and along the sides. Bake for 5-7 minutes to set, and then set aside.

Grind the pecans in the food processor till the texture of coarse salt. I found it helpful to add the brown sugar a bit at a time till it was about he same consistency. Mix in salt and vanilla. Set aside.

Beat the eggs till fluffy, add in corn syrup and pecan mixture till blended, and pour into the pie plate.

Bake for approximately 40 minutes, but check it at 30 minutes. If the crust seems too brown before the pie has risen evenly, turn down to 325 and cook for 15-20 till even. Let cool completely before cutting.

Top with whipped cream(I prefer to make mine with some heavy cream and Bailey’s) The pie should be soft and gooey but still be able to be cut in slices.

Unexpected Flavors: Lost and Found in Venice

I don’t need a paddle, I need pasta.

Upon returning to Venice for a day trip with my brother I had set my heart on finding the little patio restaurant I discovered on my last trip into town. Only problem was I couldn’t remember the name… or where it was…or what the dish was called. Only that we decided to find an authentic meal in Venice on a Friday night, and that was going to take some reconnaissance. We waited till around 8:30 near one of the piazzas, and watched for the most Venetian looking group of adults speaking Italian and walking with purpose…and followed them.. Down the maze of winding streets and bridges we walked a few feet behind until finally they darted down an alley. This was either exactly what we were looking for or we were about to get yelled at in Italian.

There is pistachio ravioli here somewhere, and I intend to find it.

A charming courtyard of winding green foliage and hanging lights, like a quaint garden party. They spoke little English and we spoke just enough Italian to order and It was perfect. Out of everything that was memorable about that meal the pistachio shrimp ravioli with cream sauce was otherworldly. It has haunted my dreams and was the kind of course you return to a place just so you can try to recreate a moment of perfection….and find what else they can blow your mind with.

So with this in mind I racked my brain on the flight, checked Google keywords  as we checked in at the hotel, read through hundreds of restaurant reviews and as we wandered the winding streets and shops and asked strangers while the regatta boats partied on by, still it eluded me. Tired, cranky and hungry, I opted for a quick nap before venturing out for replacement dinner. When I opened my eyes as if delivered by dream, “Al Profeta” was magically on my tongue! It came up in Google Maps! It was mine!

I poured over the menu again and again,  searching in vain through the menu for my long lost pistachio love. When I still came up empty my Italian still proved insufficient in my attempt to ask If it might still exist. The waiter pointed out another dish with pistachio, but it seemed a little strange.. But I had come this far. So I picked the entree with pistachio even if the other ingredients didn’t entirely make sense to me.

And a believer was born.

Pistachios, Ricotta, bacon “jumps” and… Cocoa pasta? I admit, I doubted it’s power. God help me I doubted.

I wasn’t sure what to expect,  but dammit I was on an adventure and not stopping now. When it arrived, I was intimidated by the inky color and silky black noodles. But if anything ever inspired me to soldier on it was the happy little bacon squiggles on top that dared me to dive in. The biggest shock in the first bite?  IT WAS NOT SWEET AT ALL. The predominant flavor was the bacon “jumps” throughout, which I at first somewhat unappealingly  mistook at first sight for onion. But the cocoa pasta had no sweetness in the flavor but rather added depth to the savory tones (not unlike a good buckwheat noodle) but with a lighter texture. The ricotta was smooth and fluffy and carried the lightly nutty flavor of the pistachios. Never before had I really considered cocoa as a savory ingredient, even knowing it wasn’t always sweet. But hello darkness my old friend, I will never underestimate you again.

And Al Profeta…we will dance again soon.

One meal in Modena

So after some quick research on the train from Bologna to Modena, I had settled on checking out a place called L’Incontro for lunch. It had been recommended by our driver a few days previously and It has good reviews on both trip advisor and google. When I researched it, it was off the main piazza and the menu looked interesting.

The restaurant was on a quiet street and the restaurant was tiny. There were only a few tables and luckily we had reserved one. I was sat and given a menu in Italian. I asked for a wine list. I asked again for a wine list. Then I asked someone else for a wine list. The waiter wouldnt bring it to me until I had ordered food, which I thought was ridiculous. Essentially, how could I, a woman no less, choose wine when I couldnt even choose what I wanted to eat yet.  You know us ladies unable to make basic decisions as to what to eat.

So Waiter Waitersen told us what we should order. He vetoed somethings we wanted and explained that we must have this magical crab pasta they offered and of course we would want the local fresh fish (which was only available in Italy and very rare). The only positive things about him were that he spoke english very well and he had nice eyeglasses. Thats it.

So after ordering the food we were allowed to order wine. The wine order of course was vetoed by Mr. Waiterson, but luckily my dining companion informed him that I was in fact a sommelier and then he dutifully, if not begrduglingly, got our wine and gave it the waitress to open for us. Maybe he was busy or maybe he just didnt want to open it for us since he disapproved of the lambrusco I chose.

“Unacceptable” But delicious lambrusco

So the first course was grilled octopus with grilled potatoes and radicchio with balsamic. The octopus was tender and had a nice char on it. The potatoes were perfectly seasoned. The bitter crunch of the raddichio balanced out the sweet balsamic. This dish was fantastic. It definitely made up for some of the snootiness we had experienced.

Grilled Octopus

The next dish was one of my favorite bites of the trip. It was a grilled artichoke with parmaggiano reggiano cream sauce and aged balsamic vinegar with crispy pieces of proscuitto. The sauce was velvety and had a wonderful nuttiness to it and the balsamic was rich, thick and syrupy and sweet.  After  the artichoke I was happy with all the suggestions the infamous Waiter had made and was excited that he has essentially dictated our meal. I was looking forward to what else was to come

Grilled Artichoke

The next course was pasta. Waiter Waiterson had waxed poetic about this crab pasta. “We had to order it”. It was a signature dish. The presentation was amazing. Blah blah blah.

So the pasta was cooked well but that is the only positive thing I can say about it.  There was hardly any crab. The sauce was under seasoned and the presentation reminds me of something I would see on “Worst cook in America”. Harsh I know.

So now my disappointment is mounting again with Waiter Waiterson. But the next course held promise. Some mysterious fish I’d never heard of, prepared simply to let the flavor of the fish shine through.  And broccoli with anchovy butter(this is butter country since the area is known for dairy products among other things).

“Fish”

So when the waitress (the only other person we saw working there) brought this dish she said very clearly in perfect english “here is your snapper”.  Snapper. Not this fish I had never heard of. Snapper I didnt even think Snapper was a Mediterranean fish. In fact, Snapper is a local fish where I live in Florida. Was this fish from florida?  Or did this waiter think that I looked like the kind of person who has never had snapper before.

The fish was awful. I wanted to like it. It was undercooked and the sauce was bland and gelatinous.

Broccoli with anchovy butter

The broccoli was also disapppointing. I was expecting broccoli drizzled with a butter that cured anchovies had been melted into. Instead I got broccoli with butter and chunks of anchovys dropped on top. Maybe I didnt understand when I ordered it but this just seems like a lazy approach. Also it was served on a thin piece of cracker which I didnt understand. Is a quarter head of broccoli traditionally served with a cracker?  I mean Waiter Waiterson definitely knew more about food/wine/life than me so this must be the only proper way to eat broccoli.

So overall, first 2 dishes: wonderful. Last 3: awful. I think Ive spoken to the service enough. I cant wait to go back to Modena to eat, with so many artisanal ingredients made and available in this town, but not at L’Incontro

 

Modena

The thing about Modena (you’re pronouncing it wrong, regardless of how you say it someone will correct you while you are there) is it is exactly what a fairytale village looks like.

Brightly Colored Buildings

The narrow streets are lined with brightly colored buildings and it is impeccably clean. The sidewalks are so small people amble down the center of the streets moving over slightly to let the few cars pass.

Modena is ranked as one of the best cities for quality of life in Italy. Its known as the center for big industry, since it is the home of Ferrari and Maserati, and of course Vinegar. Balsamic Vinegar is known as the black gold of this town.

As we walked down the streets there were so many cute little cafes and shops. Everything pristine, and well kept.

 

In the center of Modena is the Piazza Mazzini and the Palazzo Comunale. The Duomo located there is a 1000 years ago.

Palazzo Comunale

This is the Duomo with the famed tower Ghilandia

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Cathedral Entrance

This is a side entrance that I wandered over to

I liked these gargoyles better.

So other than exploring the Fairy Tale-esque building, the main reason you visit Modena is to go the Museo Del Balsamico Tradizionale or one of the many Consorterias.

Im very excited to learn more about and taste Balsalmicos, but Im mostly excited to stand somewhere warm for a while

There will be one whole post dedicated to the visit to the Consorteria and all the incrdible balsalmicos I tasted.

So what else, other than Balsalmic, Fast Cars, Great Architecture, Amazing Restaurants would you want to see while in Modena.  Well theres the Albinelli Covered Market. This is the bustling hunb of this town.Its where most people gets their produce, fresh pasta, wine, salumi, cheese and more than likely gossip.

The market has all the little known specailties of Modena like Nocino, which is a locally made walnut liquor, Sassolino another local liquor used for trifles, ready made Trifles and Amaretti cookies which are two desserts that are quintessentially Modenese according to the locals.

 

 

The outside of the market is pretty unassuming

No big deal just some stunning artwork in the middle of the market

Produce stalls in the market

 

Fish Market in the Market

Some of these pictures I snagged off the internet, waiting for the market to open after lunch and an attempt to keep warm compelled us to get a little (more than necessary) Grappa and therefor the quality as well as quantity of pictures lessened.

 

The Grappas!

Tiganello

So I would be remiss if I didnt have an entire post dedicated to a phenomenal bottle of wine I had whilst in Parma. This wine was special. As was the company I shared while drinking it.

The wine itself, like most of Italy, is drenched in history. Often refered to Italys “first modern wine” it was the wine that broke all the rules in Tuscany and coined the term super tuscan.

The Antinori Family has been making wine for 600 hundred years

This wine was the first sangiovese to aged in barriques, the first sangiovese to be blended with non traditional grapes (Cabernet Sauvignon and later on the addition of Cabernet Franc) and one of the first wines made in Chianti that did not include any white grapes.

The wine is produced exclusively from the vineyard bearing the same name. A small 140 acre parcel. And since its inception in 1971, it has only been vinified in favorable vintages.

The initial reactions of the Italian wine establishment were, obviously, mixed, yet, from the very start Tignanello was immensely successful in the international markets, and soon it was hailed as one of the prized Supertuscans.

Ever since 1982, the blend has been the one currently used : 80% Sangiovese, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon and 5% Cabernet Franc.

In the cellar of La Greppia in Parma we had this last bottle from the 1988 vintage. A wine almost 30 years old. It was complex and lively still. Very pronounced tobacco with almost a curry powder like aroma. The fruit was not lost. Blackberry and jammy notes. The wine was silky. It was the icing on the cake for an already amazing meal. .

Ill always remember this meal and this bottle of wine.

My best meal in Italy

I should say, I mean my best meal in Italy this trip. Each region of Italy has such a different food identity its like comparing apples to oranges if I were to compare my best meal in Emilia Romagna to my best meal in Tuscany to my best meal in the Amalfi Coast.

So first of all walking in the streets of Parma most every restaurant looks amazing. The menus posted by the doors boast famed local ingredients, and sophisticated preparations.  The one thing that I absolutely had to have was culatello while I was there. Culatello is the most prized salumi in Italy and of course unavailable in the U.S. The city of Zibello (In the provence of Parma) is the only place that produces it. It is said that climate of that tiny borghi is what gives the ham its innate sweetness and heady fragrance.

With only plans for one meal in Parma, the bar was set very high. I chose a small restaurant called La Greppia. It was warm and cozy inside with waiters with jackets and white table cloths although it didnt feel stuffy. Almost every table was occupied for lunch.

It took me a minute to realize what was missing, but the menus for ladies do not include prices.

The wine list at this place was incredible. The waiter said there was a very large Cantina( wine cellar) underneath the space. The prices of the wines were fantastic. The prices of Italian wines in italy is obviously a better deal than in the states but this cantina held tons of back vintages with seemingly very little markup from the original purchase price.

I love the rare occasions I can drink almost as old as I am

The first course was proscuitto wrapped Parmigiano Reggiano pan fried on top of a lentil puree. This is the most sophisticated delicious version of fried cheese I have ever heard of.

Culatello!!

So this is the aforementioned and rhapsodized about Culatello.  Even the consumption of culatello has its own guidelines for bringing out the most flavor and fragrance. Well-aged culatello, which is hard to the touch, should be cut free from any twine, rinsed in tepid running water and carefully brushed clean.

The meat should be softened in very dry white wine for a couple of days. Then the skin should be removed and any fat trimmed off. The culatello is then ready to be thinly sliced by hand. The direction of the cut and the slightly irregular width caused by the blade of the knife contribute to the experience and flavor of culatello. Otherwise, one would use a meatslicer and the resulting slices would be precise and even.

The best way to conserve culatello, once it has been sliced, is to spread a little olive oil or butter onto the exposed part.   The butter served with this dish is made from winter milk of Parma cows. The meat should then be wrapped in a towel, preferably made of linen, and moistened with dry white wine. The culatello should be kept in a fresh place, but definitely not the refrigerator, which would destroy the flavor. (This how to eat serve culatello info is from www.academiabarilla.com)

Pasta course was house made tagliatelle with rabbit ragu. Rabbit is a very common ingredient in traditional emilia rogmanga cooking. The pasta was delcious with the perfect amount of chew and the rabbit was very delicate. The fresh fava beans were wonderful.

This simple dish was amazing. Braised veal cheek with polenta. We all know that the cheeks of the animal are often the most tasty parts. The cheek was falling apart it was so tender and the platewas drizzled with what I assume was the braising liquid. By the time this dish made it in front of me I was so full with all the rich Parmesan food I didnt want to take another bite, but I couldnt resist this.

La Greppia was an incredible experience as was exploring Parma. You can tell that the people who live and work in the gastronomical mecca love what they do and have such pride in the local delicacies that are available.

A day in Parma

When I think of Parma I literally hear an aria of Angels in my head. Parma is like the promised land of cured meats and cheeses.

Although I traveled there for food, Parma is a cultural and artistic hub in the Emilia Romagna region. Its the home to one of the best opera houses in Italy, the Teatro Farnese, beautiful cathedrals, museums, and a botanical garden.

Teatro Farnese

Parma Cathedral

 

The ceiling of the Duomo. The cathedral is home to several frescos by renowned painter Corregio

An entrance to the botantical gardens, which I did not explore (It was like 30 degrees outside)

Monasterodi San Giovanni Evangelista

Most people think of Proscuitto, Culatello, Parmagiana as being the main food attraction to Parma, and they are quite the attraction but the Piazza della Ghiaia hosts one of the best markets in Italy every morning but sunday.

Local Salumi

 

One market stall seemingly dedicated to cured anchovies

I dont know why Parma isnt on many tourists radar but its definitely worth a trip. Even the surrounding areas are great to visit. Because Parma is such a wealthy town the country side is literally littered with Castles. Some open to the public for tours, some even available for lodging via AirBnb.

 

 

Mercato di Mezzo

The Mercato di Mezzo ( ” The Middle Market”) is very close to the Piazza Maggiore near the Quadrilatico area. The area has been a meeting place since the middle ages, and after the unification of Italy, it was transformed into the first indoor market of the city, and in 2014 it was recovered and renovated, after many years of being abandoned it was finally reopened.

The market has 3 floors. The basement houses a craft brewery, the first floor food stalls, and the top floor a pizzeria. They offer meat, fish, sausages,cheese, fruit, bread, pasta, gelato, pastry and most importantly wine.

No one is outside because its January and it feels like it 15 below outside

The place was packed every time I went there and for good reason. The food is great and inexpensive. This is one of  bologna’s versions of fast food and it puts everything about American fast food to shame.

Lots of different type of fresh pasta are available to have prepared or take out.

Enoteca Regionale Emilia Romagna has a stall in the market. Glasses of wine start at 3 Euros for a generous pour.

Most of the stalls are run by or partnered with well known chefs and well respected shops and restaurants. The wine shop us partnered with a local wine museum and shop. The bakery, Forno Calzoni is affiliated with one of the most famous bakeries in Bologna. (So says their literature, I am not claiming to be a Bolognese Bakery expert, and I don’t know if my waistline could afford such endeavors)

Chatted with this guy and he said he really loved working in the market because of the people and the energy. But he was on the look out for another job since he was in his twenties and needs to find a wife and start a family. So any interested ladies head to the butcher counter…

I sat in front of the Butcher Stall, Macelleria Zivieri, because there were no other seats to be had. If you sit in front of the stall you have to order something from them. I ordered a small plate of salumi.

This is considered small?? Only cost 6 Euros.

Cannelloni special from the Romanzo Stall

This is the best cannelloni Ive ever had. It was very thin pasta rolled with a light meat sauce and tons of cheese. It was baked until the cheese on the top got caramelized and crunchy while the cheese on the inside was creamy and gooey.

 

Inexpensive wine from Tuscany

 

The wine stall was busiest second only to the seafood stall. I didnt want to risk waiting so long in the line that my seat got snatched up.  So I got wine from the same stall as the cannelloni (most of the stalls sell wine).  This wine is 92 points from Decanter magazine and cost 19 Euros. Its from a small 7 Ha estate in the higher altitudes of tuscany and is grown biodynamically. A great suggestion from the girl behind the counter.

Lambrusco

First of all let me say I love bubbles and can happily drink sparkling wine all day.  Im a firm believer in pairing vintage champagne with every course of a meal.  So naturally I love the mostly dry, slightly earthy inky sparkler known as Lambrusco.

Lambrusco has had a bad rep in the united states. Real Lambrusco is nothing like the insipidly sweet wine that was originally popular in the 1970s (I blame you mom and dad). It can be made in several different styles but they all similar in the respect that they are phenonenmal when paired with the rich, fatty salumis and cheeses from their shared region (They also make Lambrusco in Lombardy but Im focusing on Emilia Romagna here.)

I tried several different labels of Lambrusco, only one had I tried before. But as Ive expereinced countless times before the place, the people and food really affect how a wine tastes and the experience

I had had this lambrusco before in my wine bar in Boca. I remember the first time I tried it. I was skeptical but  it was brought to me by one of my reps that was a “Cool Girl”. Meaning she knew all the cool wines and hip winemakers. Like the stuff people were drinking at much cooler places other than Boca Raton. I tried it, and this  was my first real impression of Lambrusco. Earthy, slightly sweet, great acidity. Fun. Easy drinking. Perfect Boat Wine (all I need is the boat). So its only natural that my first Lambrusco in Bologna was the first Lambrusco I ever had.

This one was had at a tiny “restaurant” off a green market. Its bright acidity went beautifully with the salumi. Sadly this was some of the most disappointing cured meat that I had on the trip. Still better than most I have had in Florida. So yes, I can complain about better quality than 99 percent of  I can get at home but sub par for the area.

So this was special. The upside down bottle in his hand is straight out of the barrel and wasn’t quite to maturity. The finished product was great, fruity,  and fragrant of perfume that is reminiscent of berries and cherries. The whole experience at the vineyard and then winery was amazing.

So they make the lambrusco that comes in the chalkboard bottle that you can write messages on for gifts. Since I wasnt planning on trying to take sparkling wine on a plane (it may be a myth that the bottles explodes, but I have had it happen), I decided to try the otello. This bottle had the most tannins out of the ones I tried, which I really liked. Lots of strawberry and blackberry aromas on the palate.

This wine was suggested by the Owner/Sommelier/Waiter/Chef(I suspect) of a teeny tiny place in Modena.  This was on the lighter side and definitely had more acidity than the previous lambrusci (I like that as a plural).  It had a fun tart cranberry flavor with sour cherry on the finish. It was really great with the octopus appetizer and crab pasta I had.

 

 

One afternoon is Dozza Part 1

I first heard about Dozza in the book “I Broghi Piu Belli D’Italia” (The beautiful small towns of Italy). The medieval town is only about 30 minutes by car away from Bologna.

One of the Pathways to Rocca Sforzesca

I was interested in going to Dozza for two reasons: the town is covered in Murals and is pften refered to an open-air museum and the Enoteca Regionale dell’ Emilia Romagna, which is a combination wine muesuem, shop and bar.

The town has “Festival of Painted Walls” every two years where are artist descend on the city and put up new art work so the town is constantly changing.

These pictures don’t do this mural justice. The colors are so vibrant in real life

Had to take some selfies infront of the beautiful artwork and show off my awesome ear muffs

So many different styles in this tiny borghi

Dozza is definitely worth a day trip to wander around the tiny town and see the huge amount incredible art covering most the walls and archways